Action 1 Restoration: Emergency Restoration & Repair Company - Feed https://www.action1restoration.net Action 1 Restoration Mon, 04 May 2020 20:25:08 +0000 Wed, 05 Aug 2020 08:13:23 +0000 en-US What is a Sump Pump and How Does it Work? https://www.action1restoration.net/water/water-damage/what-is-a-sump-pump/ Sat, 07 Mar 2020 10:06:17 +0000 https://www.action1restoration.net/?p=1869

If You Have a Basement, You Should Have a Sump Pump

If you have a flooded basement, it's important to act fast so you can remedy the situation as quickly as possible. However, once the water has dried, you should also think about how you can work to prevent this from happening again in the future. At Action 1 Restoration, we recommend homeowners have a sump pump installed as a preventative solution for basement flooding. Since most homeowners who have basements are likely to deal with flooding at some point, this is an important tool in mitigating water damage and avoiding a disaster.

What is a Sump Pump?

Sump pumps are submersible pumps that are installed inside of sump pits at the lowest part of a basement. They work quickly to remove water that can be common in basements, whether from leaking or flooding. By draining and directing the water to an area away from your home's foundation, this ensures water damage can be prevented and your basement can stay dry no matter what's going on with the weather, or your plumbing. Although common in new construction homes, especially in areas that are at an increased risk of flooding, sump pumps aren't always found in older homes with basements. However, this has changed in recent years as homeowners have become more proactive in preventative maintenance. More sump pumps are now being installed in older homes in order to prevent the stress and damage that a flooded basement can create. what is a sump pump and how it works

How Does a Sump Pump Work?

To better understand what you can expect from one of these machines, it's important to learn a few details about the mechanics of how they work. Sump pumps are generally placed inside of sump pits. These are holes with gravel bases that are situated in the lowest part of the basement. Connected to this machine is a pipe that extends outside of the home so that water can be drained away from the foundation of the home. This same pipe is equipped with a check valve that prevents any outside water from coming back inside and filling the pit back up. Once the pressure sensor inside of the machine detects water, the pump will turn on and begin taking water out of the pit. However, some sump pumps are not automatic and must be manually operated by the homeowner. There are also two different types of sump pump designs, including a submersible pump, which has a waterproof encasing so it can stay inside the sump pit at the bottom. The other is a pedestal sump pump, which will sit at the top of a sump pit to avoid getting wet.

What to Look for in a Sump Pump

If you plan on purchasing one of these machines for your home, you'll quickly find that there are many options. One of the best ways to narrow down your choices is by taking the time to learn more about the equipment and features that each has to offer. The details below are some you'll want to keep in mind and compare for each unit.
  • A voltage of 110 is adequate if you're using the machine within an average home. Warehouses or large buildings should have sump pumps with a voltage of 220+.
  • A machine with automatic controls is preferable, as this is more convenient than a manual sump pump.
  • If you're only dealing with water inside of an average home, then horsepower at one-quarter to one-third should be adequate.
  • Head pressure will determine the height that the pump can raise water, with most being around 12-feet in length.
  • A backup system is recommended if you'd like your sump pump to continue to work even after the power has gone out.

What Happens When it Floods?

With a sump pump properly installed, you will have a very low chance of experiencing flooding in your basement. Since it's estimated that over 90% of basements will be impacted by moisture at some point, this means you may be able avoid water damage many times. This can give you peace of mind in your home, especially if you live in an area that's prone to flooding. While it's beneficial to avoid damage because of the hassle, this also means avoiding costly water damage repairs that would otherwise be necessary.

What if Flooding Has Already Happened?

If your home has already been flooded and your basement is wet, you'll need to get started with water damage restoration as soon as possible. Our team at Action 1 Restoration strongly recommends hiring a professional if you don't have experience with this on your own. There is a lot of different commercial grade equipment that is used during the entire process. This will ensure your home and basement are properly dried and can be recovered without the risk of mold and mildew growth. Once finished, you can work with a contractor to have your choice of sump pump installed and working right away.  

What is a Sump Pump and How Does it Work? was originally seen on website for A1R(Action1Restoration)

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If You Have a Basement, You Should Have a Sump Pump

If you have a flooded basement, it's important to act fast so you can remedy the situation as quickly as possible. However, once the water has dried, you should also think about how you can work to prevent this from happening again in the future. At Action 1 Restoration, we recommend homeowners have a sump pump installed as a preventative solution for basement flooding. Since most homeowners who have basements are likely to deal with flooding at some point, this is an important tool in mitigating water damage and avoiding a disaster.

What is a Sump Pump?

Sump pumps are submersible pumps that are installed inside of sump pits at the lowest part of a basement. They work quickly to remove water that can be common in basements, whether from leaking or flooding. By draining and directing the water to an area away from your home's foundation, this ensures water damage can be prevented and your basement can stay dry no matter what's going on with the weather, or your plumbing. Although common in new construction homes, especially in areas that are at an increased risk of flooding, sump pumps aren't always found in older homes with basements. However, this has changed in recent years as homeowners have become more proactive in preventative maintenance. More sump pumps are now being installed in older homes in order to prevent the stress and damage that a flooded basement can create. what is a sump pump and how it works

How Does a Sump Pump Work?

To better understand what you can expect from one of these machines, it's important to learn a few details about the mechanics of how they work. Sump pumps are generally placed inside of sump pits. These are holes with gravel bases that are situated in the lowest part of the basement. Connected to this machine is a pipe that extends outside of the home so that water can be drained away from the foundation of the home. This same pipe is equipped with a check valve that prevents any outside water from coming back inside and filling the pit back up. Once the pressure sensor inside of the machine detects water, the pump will turn on and begin taking water out of the pit. However, some sump pumps are not automatic and must be manually operated by the homeowner. There are also two different types of sump pump designs, including a submersible pump, which has a waterproof encasing so it can stay inside the sump pit at the bottom. The other is a pedestal sump pump, which will sit at the top of a sump pit to avoid getting wet.

What to Look for in a Sump Pump

If you plan on purchasing one of these machines for your home, you'll quickly find that there are many options. One of the best ways to narrow down your choices is by taking the time to learn more about the equipment and features that each has to offer. The details below are some you'll want to keep in mind and compare for each unit.
  • A voltage of 110 is adequate if you're using the machine within an average home. Warehouses or large buildings should have sump pumps with a voltage of 220+.
  • A machine with automatic controls is preferable, as this is more convenient than a manual sump pump.
  • If you're only dealing with water inside of an average home, then horsepower at one-quarter to one-third should be adequate.
  • Head pressure will determine the height that the pump can raise water, with most being around 12-feet in length.
  • A backup system is recommended if you'd like your sump pump to continue to work even after the power has gone out.

What Happens When it Floods?

With a sump pump properly installed, you will have a very low chance of experiencing flooding in your basement. Since it's estimated that over 90% of basements will be impacted by moisture at some point, this means you may be able avoid water damage many times. This can give you peace of mind in your home, especially if you live in an area that's prone to flooding. While it's beneficial to avoid damage because of the hassle, this also means avoiding costly water damage repairs that would otherwise be necessary.

What if Flooding Has Already Happened?

If your home has already been flooded and your basement is wet, you'll need to get started with water damage restoration as soon as possible. Our team at Action 1 Restoration strongly recommends hiring a professional if you don't have experience with this on your own. There is a lot of different commercial grade equipment that is used during the entire process. This will ensure your home and basement are properly dried and can be recovered without the risk of mold and mildew growth. Once finished, you can work with a contractor to have your choice of sump pump installed and working right away.  

What is a Sump Pump and How Does it Work? was originally seen on website for A1R(Action1Restoration)

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Water Damaged Subfloor: How to Dry Out and Replace https://www.action1restoration.net/water/water-damage/damaged-subfloor-how-to-dry-out-and-replace/ Mon, 02 Mar 2020 01:20:55 +0000 https://www.action1restoration.net/?p=1858 When a house is built, the structure begins with many base layers that set the foundation for a strong and lasting home. This includes the subflooring, which is a thick and durable material that can be found underneath the tile, wood, or carpeting inside of your home. This layer generally rests on the joists of the home to create a strong base for any flooring you choose to have installed. In general, most homeowners will never see this base unless they change out their flooring. However, in situations where water damage is present, subflooring can play a key role in the cleanup process. If you're in a situation where your home has water damage and your flooring has been impacted, the information below can help. At Action 1 Restoration, we share this information because we prioritize helping homeowners understand more about their homes and how water damage can impact each area.

How to Dry Out the Subfloor Effectively

If a flood or leak has occurred inside of your home, it's almost guaranteed that the flooring will be impacted. Unfortunately, this will not safely dry out on its own. In fact, leaving flooring to dry naturally can make the damage worse while also giving mold and mildew a chance to grow. To have the best chance of preserving your home, proper drying is crucial. To do so, our company at Action 1 Restoration recommends first stopping the source of water. After this, it's important to remove excess standing water with a wet/dry vacuum and/or large buckets. The next step in drying out a water damaged subfloor is to remove the flooring from the top of it. This can be done on your own with a few tools, although some homeowners prefer to contact professionals to avoid causing more damage. If you're not comfortable with this type of work, we highly recommend asking for help from the start. Once all impacted flooring has been removed, you'll want to dispose of it outside to prevent the moisture from staying indoors. Once the flooring is removed, the real drying of the subfloor can begin. This should start with placing thick plastic sheeting over the flooded area and securing it down with tape on the sides. It's important to make sure tape is covering each seam so the plastic is completely sealed. From here, take a utility heater and place the spout of it underneath a small portion of the plastic. Seal the edges and then turn on the heater. At this point, the plastic should inflate and fill with air as the heater runs. In most homes, the heater will need to run for three or more days to completely dry the subflooring. However, we recommend checking daily to see how the subfloor is progressing. If you're not able to tell by touch, then a moisture meter is an inexpensive tool worth investing in. This will tell you how much moisture is left so you know when it's completely dry and safe to begin working on. When the drying process is finished, the plastic can be removed and disposed of so you can move on with the rest of the restoration.

Types of Subflooring

There are four main types of subflooring materials that are used in the construction of most homes. These include:
  • Plywood: This is the most common type of subflooring and it is very likely what you'll find in your home. It's made up of many sheets of wood veneer that are bonded together with high heat and pressure. It's strong, easy to work with, and easy to install.
  • Concrete: Concrete slabs are not as common but can be found in homes throughout the country. While it may not seem like this material can be affected by moisture, it can still take a long time to fully dry.
  • High-Performance Panels: High-performance panels are specially designed to resist moisture absorption so that they do not swell or warp. These are becoming more common but are unlikely to be in older homes unless there has been significant work done to improve the flooring.
  • Oriental Strand Board: This material is made of strands of plywood that are pressed together in a crossing pattern. This helps reduce water absorption by increasing density, which is why it has become more common in homes built today.

How to Remove Subflooring

In most homes, the subfloor is made of plywood that's 3/4" or 5/8" thick. When it's exposed to water and not dried out promptly, it will swell and can eventually rot or experience mold growth. Moisture can also cause problems with the structural integrity of the subflooring and eventually lead to safety issues within the home. This is why, in some situations, it's crucial to remove the subflooring so it can be replaced. To start the removal process, Action 1 Restoration recommends having the following tools:
  • Screwdriver
  • Pry Bar
  • Circular Saw
  • Clawhammer
  • Diagonal Pliers
  • Drill
  • Jigsaw
If you don't already have these tools or aren't comfortable using them, then you may want to hire a professional to help you. Most contractors can remove subflooring in much less time than it would take an inexperienced homeowner. Either way, it's important to make sure the job is done right so that all of the impacted subflooring is completely removed. Missing even a small portion could result in hidden mold growth or an unstable flooring area. Once you're ready to get started, you'll need to determine the best removal method for the type of subflooring you have. If it's made of wood, you'll want to use a circular saw to carefully cut through the area that has been impacted. Keep in mind, you don't want to cut deeper than the wood, so go slowly and be gentle with the amount of pressure you put on the saw. Once finished cutting the perimeter, use a pry bar and hammer to lift small sections. Since these will likely be hammered in at the joists, you'll also need to pull up nails to get the sections out completely. Tip: If you only have concrete subflooring, then it's likely you won't need to remove it after a flood. However, thorough drying will be necessary to prevent mold growth and ensure new flooring can be safely installed.

How to Replace Subflooring

Once the ruined subflooring is out, it will be time to install the new material to make the base complete again. To do this, new subflooring materials should be purchased right away. If you must replace all of the materials, then you may want to consider upgrading to high performance panels or oriental strand board for better protection from water damage in the future. Once you have the material, you'll need to measure and cut panels to place back into the areas that were removed. This may also require fastening them to joists to further secure their placement. After the subflooring has been completely replaced with new materials, you'll be able to install new flooring on top. This is another project you may not feel confident doing on your own, especially if you don't already have the tools required. Fortunately, you can hire a contractor to do both the flooring and subflooring for you. Their assistance can give you peace of mind, knowing the work was done the right way.

Restoring Your Home After Water Damage

When dealing with water damage in your home, it's always important to address the subflooring. If this is something you're not able to do on your own, then don't hesitate to call professionals such as ours at Action 1 Restoration. We can help you recover, replace, and restore your subflooring and flooring so your home is put back together and comes out looking like new again.  

Water Damaged Subfloor: How to Dry Out and Replace was first published on Action1Restoration (A1R)

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When a house is built, the structure begins with many base layers that set the foundation for a strong and lasting home. This includes the subflooring, which is a thick and durable material that can be found underneath the tile, wood, or carpeting inside of your home. This layer generally rests on the joists of the home to create a strong base for any flooring you choose to have installed. In general, most homeowners will never see this base unless they change out their flooring. However, in situations where water damage is present, subflooring can play a key role in the cleanup process. If you're in a situation where your home has water damage and your flooring has been impacted, the information below can help. At Action 1 Restoration, we share this information because we prioritize helping homeowners understand more about their homes and how water damage can impact each area.

How to Dry Out the Subfloor Effectively

If a flood or leak has occurred inside of your home, it's almost guaranteed that the flooring will be impacted. Unfortunately, this will not safely dry out on its own. In fact, leaving flooring to dry naturally can make the damage worse while also giving mold and mildew a chance to grow. To have the best chance of preserving your home, proper drying is crucial. To do so, our company at Action 1 Restoration recommends first stopping the source of water. After this, it's important to remove excess standing water with a wet/dry vacuum and/or large buckets. The next step in drying out a water damaged subfloor is to remove the flooring from the top of it. This can be done on your own with a few tools, although some homeowners prefer to contact professionals to avoid causing more damage. If you're not comfortable with this type of work, we highly recommend asking for help from the start. Once all impacted flooring has been removed, you'll want to dispose of it outside to prevent the moisture from staying indoors. Once the flooring is removed, the real drying of the subfloor can begin. This should start with placing thick plastic sheeting over the flooded area and securing it down with tape on the sides. It's important to make sure tape is covering each seam so the plastic is completely sealed. From here, take a utility heater and place the spout of it underneath a small portion of the plastic. Seal the edges and then turn on the heater. At this point, the plastic should inflate and fill with air as the heater runs. In most homes, the heater will need to run for three or more days to completely dry the subflooring. However, we recommend checking daily to see how the subfloor is progressing. If you're not able to tell by touch, then a moisture meter is an inexpensive tool worth investing in. This will tell you how much moisture is left so you know when it's completely dry and safe to begin working on. When the drying process is finished, the plastic can be removed and disposed of so you can move on with the rest of the restoration.

Types of Subflooring

There are four main types of subflooring materials that are used in the construction of most homes. These include:
  • Plywood: This is the most common type of subflooring and it is very likely what you'll find in your home. It's made up of many sheets of wood veneer that are bonded together with high heat and pressure. It's strong, easy to work with, and easy to install.
  • Concrete: Concrete slabs are not as common but can be found in homes throughout the country. While it may not seem like this material can be affected by moisture, it can still take a long time to fully dry.
  • High-Performance Panels: High-performance panels are specially designed to resist moisture absorption so that they do not swell or warp. These are becoming more common but are unlikely to be in older homes unless there has been significant work done to improve the flooring.
  • Oriental Strand Board: This material is made of strands of plywood that are pressed together in a crossing pattern. This helps reduce water absorption by increasing density, which is why it has become more common in homes built today.

How to Remove Subflooring

In most homes, the subfloor is made of plywood that's 3/4" or 5/8" thick. When it's exposed to water and not dried out promptly, it will swell and can eventually rot or experience mold growth. Moisture can also cause problems with the structural integrity of the subflooring and eventually lead to safety issues within the home. This is why, in some situations, it's crucial to remove the subflooring so it can be replaced. To start the removal process, Action 1 Restoration recommends having the following tools:
  • Screwdriver
  • Pry Bar
  • Circular Saw
  • Clawhammer
  • Diagonal Pliers
  • Drill
  • Jigsaw
If you don't already have these tools or aren't comfortable using them, then you may want to hire a professional to help you. Most contractors can remove subflooring in much less time than it would take an inexperienced homeowner. Either way, it's important to make sure the job is done right so that all of the impacted subflooring is completely removed. Missing even a small portion could result in hidden mold growth or an unstable flooring area. Once you're ready to get started, you'll need to determine the best removal method for the type of subflooring you have. If it's made of wood, you'll want to use a circular saw to carefully cut through the area that has been impacted. Keep in mind, you don't want to cut deeper than the wood, so go slowly and be gentle with the amount of pressure you put on the saw. Once finished cutting the perimeter, use a pry bar and hammer to lift small sections. Since these will likely be hammered in at the joists, you'll also need to pull up nails to get the sections out completely. Tip: If you only have concrete subflooring, then it's likely you won't need to remove it after a flood. However, thorough drying will be necessary to prevent mold growth and ensure new flooring can be safely installed.

How to Replace Subflooring

Once the ruined subflooring is out, it will be time to install the new material to make the base complete again. To do this, new subflooring materials should be purchased right away. If you must replace all of the materials, then you may want to consider upgrading to high performance panels or oriental strand board for better protection from water damage in the future. Once you have the material, you'll need to measure and cut panels to place back into the areas that were removed. This may also require fastening them to joists to further secure their placement. After the subflooring has been completely replaced with new materials, you'll be able to install new flooring on top. This is another project you may not feel confident doing on your own, especially if you don't already have the tools required. Fortunately, you can hire a contractor to do both the flooring and subflooring for you. Their assistance can give you peace of mind, knowing the work was done the right way.

Restoring Your Home After Water Damage

When dealing with water damage in your home, it's always important to address the subflooring. If this is something you're not able to do on your own, then don't hesitate to call professionals such as ours at Action 1 Restoration. We can help you recover, replace, and restore your subflooring and flooring so your home is put back together and comes out looking like new again.  

Water Damaged Subfloor: How to Dry Out and Replace was first published on Action1Restoration (A1R)

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Dangers of Standing Water and What to Do https://www.action1restoration.net/water/water-damage/stagnant-water-dangers/ Fri, 28 Feb 2020 05:08:27 +0000 https://www.action1restoration.net/?p=1849 It's estimated that roughly one out of every 50 homes will have a water damage claim each year. While some of these homes will clean up quickly, others will deal with subsequent issues such as stagnant water. At Action 1 Restoration, it's important for us to teach homeowners more about what this can mean for their homes. With this understanding, you can be empowered to take care of water damage the right way and avoid the dangers that can be associated with stagnant water.

What You Need to Know About Stagnant Water?

Also known as standing water, this is water that sits in place without having any area to drain to in a timely manner. In homes that are flooded, stagnant water can be found just about anywhere, from the top of the ceiling to the floors and basement. Since standing water can come from many different sources, including rain or an indoor water supply line, it's important not to assume it's safe. When any type of water sits for long periods of time, whether it comes from the sewer or a clean source, it can quickly breed bacteria that is dangerous. While this can worsen water damage by the hour, it can also increase the risk of mold and mildew growth. What's even worse is that mosquitoes and other pests are naturally attracted to standing water, which can mean an unexpected infestation quickly developing in your home. There are many reasons that can cause an excess of water in the walls and on the floors of your home.

What are the Dangers of Stagnant Water

  • Standing sewer water can expose your family to bacteria and parasites that negatively impact your health
  • Clean standing water can attract pests and insects that carry diseases
  • All standing water can result in mold growth within 24-48 hours
  • Standing water can continue to cause damage to floors, walls, ceiling, and furniture as it's left to soak into all nearby materials
There are many health risks associated with stagnant water, which is why our team at Action 1 Restoration urges homeowners to handle this situation immediately. When water sits for long periods of time, it will become increasingly hazardous. This can be dangerous for every member of your family, including pets and children. Even if the water came from a clean source, it's crucial to act quickly.

How to Remove Standing Water

We understand that once you know the dangers of stagnant water, you can feel an urgency to get rid of it as soon as possible. Fortunately, there are many ways to get started. Our team at Action 1 Restoration has shared some of our top tips below to help you tackle standing water quickly and with the best results possible.

Get the Water Out

After you've found and eliminated the source of water, it's important to begin hauling the water outside. This can be done in many ways, depending on how much water you have. In most situations, buckets, towels, and a wet/dry vacuum are excellent tools to have in your arsenal. Tip: If you're dealing with water coming from the sewer or any other contaminated sources, we recommend contacting a professional. This will ensure the right steps are taken to keep your family and home safe. Working with contaminated water on your own can put you at risk of illness.

Dry It Quickly

It's important to dry out the space as quickly as possible once the excess standing water has been removed. This will help prevent the growth of mold and it can minimize the risk of an insect infestation. To do this, you should start by bringing in a couple of industrial fans to the room and pointing them toward the areas that have the most moisture. Use as many fans as is possible to speed up the drying process. A dehumidifier is another essential tool for drying out a room that has been impacted by water damage. This will draw moisture out of the air so the space dries more quickly than it would with fans alone. If you are dealing with a large area, you may need an industrial machine to get this done. Tip: Do a full inspection of your home to make sure you've found all areas that have standing water in them. This should include the attic, the basement, and any rooms that may have been impacted by the flood. By being thorough, you'll avoid missing areas that are damaged and may be potentially hazardous due to excess water.

Get Damaged Materials Out

Once the room is dry to the touch, it's important to remove the materials that are damaged and beyond saving. This includes insulation, which can easily hold water for long periods of time and be difficult to dry completely. By getting these materials out, you'll have confidence that all moisture has been eliminated and there is no more standing water within your space.

Restoring Your Home After a Flood

Although getting the stagnant water out of your home is a huge accomplishment, this is not the last step in recovering from water damage. After thoroughly drying and removing the damaged materials, you'll need to take care to replace what has been removed to ensure your home is structurally safe and well insulated. This is likely to require construction, especially if you had major damage that impacted the structure of your home or any wiring/pipes. When this is the case, always hire a contractor to help you.

Important Facts About Stagnant Water

  • Excess water can be dangerous for small children and pets, which is why it's recommended to vacate them from the house before you get started working.
  • Mosquitoes and other insects can carry life-threatening diseases, such as malaria, dengue, and West Nile virus.
  • Once mold grows, it can cause respiratory issues for anyone who is living inside of the home. This is why we strongly recommend living elsewhere until your home is fully restored.
  • If standing water is located near electrical outlets or wiring, do not step in it. Always contact a professional to avoid the risk of electrocution or shock.
  • Stagnant water that's the result of a broken sewer line should always be handled by a professional who is equipped with the proper cleanup equipment.

Expert Service When You Need Help

If you need help dealing with stagnant water, then our team at Action 1 Restoration recommends working with a trained team of professionals. Our restoration technicians, in particular, are trained to deal with all types of flooding and varying degrees of standing water damage. They will help make sure you are safe, and your home is recovered properly from start to finish.  

Dangers of Standing Water and What to Do was originally published on www.action1restoration.net/

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It's estimated that roughly one out of every 50 homes will have a water damage claim each year. While some of these homes will clean up quickly, others will deal with subsequent issues such as stagnant water. At Action 1 Restoration, it's important for us to teach homeowners more about what this can mean for their homes. With this understanding, you can be empowered to take care of water damage the right way and avoid the dangers that can be associated with stagnant water.

What You Need to Know About Stagnant Water?

Also known as standing water, this is water that sits in place without having any area to drain to in a timely manner. In homes that are flooded, stagnant water can be found just about anywhere, from the top of the ceiling to the floors and basement. Since standing water can come from many different sources, including rain or an indoor water supply line, it's important not to assume it's safe. When any type of water sits for long periods of time, whether it comes from the sewer or a clean source, it can quickly breed bacteria that is dangerous. While this can worsen water damage by the hour, it can also increase the risk of mold and mildew growth. What's even worse is that mosquitoes and other pests are naturally attracted to standing water, which can mean an unexpected infestation quickly developing in your home. There are many reasons that can cause an excess of water in the walls and on the floors of your home.

What are the Dangers of Stagnant Water

  • Standing sewer water can expose your family to bacteria and parasites that negatively impact your health
  • Clean standing water can attract pests and insects that carry diseases
  • All standing water can result in mold growth within 24-48 hours
  • Standing water can continue to cause damage to floors, walls, ceiling, and furniture as it's left to soak into all nearby materials
There are many health risks associated with stagnant water, which is why our team at Action 1 Restoration urges homeowners to handle this situation immediately. When water sits for long periods of time, it will become increasingly hazardous. This can be dangerous for every member of your family, including pets and children. Even if the water came from a clean source, it's crucial to act quickly.

How to Remove Standing Water

We understand that once you know the dangers of stagnant water, you can feel an urgency to get rid of it as soon as possible. Fortunately, there are many ways to get started. Our team at Action 1 Restoration has shared some of our top tips below to help you tackle standing water quickly and with the best results possible.

Get the Water Out

After you've found and eliminated the source of water, it's important to begin hauling the water outside. This can be done in many ways, depending on how much water you have. In most situations, buckets, towels, and a wet/dry vacuum are excellent tools to have in your arsenal. Tip: If you're dealing with water coming from the sewer or any other contaminated sources, we recommend contacting a professional. This will ensure the right steps are taken to keep your family and home safe. Working with contaminated water on your own can put you at risk of illness.

Dry It Quickly

It's important to dry out the space as quickly as possible once the excess standing water has been removed. This will help prevent the growth of mold and it can minimize the risk of an insect infestation. To do this, you should start by bringing in a couple of industrial fans to the room and pointing them toward the areas that have the most moisture. Use as many fans as is possible to speed up the drying process. A dehumidifier is another essential tool for drying out a room that has been impacted by water damage. This will draw moisture out of the air so the space dries more quickly than it would with fans alone. If you are dealing with a large area, you may need an industrial machine to get this done. Tip: Do a full inspection of your home to make sure you've found all areas that have standing water in them. This should include the attic, the basement, and any rooms that may have been impacted by the flood. By being thorough, you'll avoid missing areas that are damaged and may be potentially hazardous due to excess water.

Get Damaged Materials Out

Once the room is dry to the touch, it's important to remove the materials that are damaged and beyond saving. This includes insulation, which can easily hold water for long periods of time and be difficult to dry completely. By getting these materials out, you'll have confidence that all moisture has been eliminated and there is no more standing water within your space.

Restoring Your Home After a Flood

Although getting the stagnant water out of your home is a huge accomplishment, this is not the last step in recovering from water damage. After thoroughly drying and removing the damaged materials, you'll need to take care to replace what has been removed to ensure your home is structurally safe and well insulated. This is likely to require construction, especially if you had major damage that impacted the structure of your home or any wiring/pipes. When this is the case, always hire a contractor to help you.

Important Facts About Stagnant Water

  • Excess water can be dangerous for small children and pets, which is why it's recommended to vacate them from the house before you get started working.
  • Mosquitoes and other insects can carry life-threatening diseases, such as malaria, dengue, and West Nile virus.
  • Once mold grows, it can cause respiratory issues for anyone who is living inside of the home. This is why we strongly recommend living elsewhere until your home is fully restored.
  • If standing water is located near electrical outlets or wiring, do not step in it. Always contact a professional to avoid the risk of electrocution or shock.
  • Stagnant water that's the result of a broken sewer line should always be handled by a professional who is equipped with the proper cleanup equipment.

Expert Service When You Need Help

If you need help dealing with stagnant water, then our team at Action 1 Restoration recommends working with a trained team of professionals. Our restoration technicians, in particular, are trained to deal with all types of flooding and varying degrees of standing water damage. They will help make sure you are safe, and your home is recovered properly from start to finish.  

Dangers of Standing Water and What to Do was originally published on www.action1restoration.net/

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How to Thaw Frozen Pipes: Burst Pipe Prevention Steps https://www.action1restoration.net/water/water-damage/how-to-thaw-frozen-pipes/ Sun, 23 Feb 2020 22:17:06 +0000 https://www.action1restoration.net/?p=1821

If Your Pipes Are Frozen, Follow These Steps to Thaw Them Out

It's estimated that over 250,000 homes will experience water damage from frozen and burst pipes each year. These contribute to the nearly 2.5 billion dollars that the insurance industry pays out yearly on water damage and mold costs. With so much time and money spent surrounding this issue, many homeowners wonder what they can do to prevent this from happening in their own homes. Fortunately, there are many things you can do to care for and properly thaw your pipes in order to minimize the risk of them bursting. Even if you've gone through many winters without any issues with your pipes, this doesn't mean you'll be problem-free this year. You never know when a problem can occur, and for many homeowners, this means a surprise flood when they least expect it. At Action 1 Restoration, we want to help homeowners minimize their home's risk of flooding. We encourage you to read the information below to learn how to prevent burst pipes, thaw frozen pipes, and restore your home if water damage does occur.

Behind the Scenes: How Pipes Freeze and Burst

In most homes, water can run freely through pipes as long as the weather does not reach below 20 degrees. Unfortunately, in climates where the weather reaches below freezing, this can result in the water inside pipes freezing overnight when residents aren't using their plumbing. This is especially true for pipes that are located in areas of the home that are not heated or fully insulated, including the garage and unfinished basements. Once pipes are frozen, the water inside will naturally expand. Unfortunately, this often causes the pipes to burst, as they aren't able to handle the change in pressure. This can result in flooding, which will worsen as the pipes begin to warm up and thaw during the day. In situations where the pipes don't completely freeze, residents may find that their water is slow to move through the pipes. This is the result of ice pieces inside of the pipes that can be slow to melt.

Risk Factors for Frozen Pipes

It's important to recognize the signs of your home being at a greater risk of frozen pipes. By doing so, you may be able to prevent this from happening. Some red flags to look for in your home include:
  • You live in a very cold climate with temperatures that reach below freezing.
  • You live in an older home that doesn't have pipes that are well insulated.
  • You live in a cold area and several areas of your home are unheated.
  • You have outdoor pipes and live in an area that reaches freezing temperatures.
  • You have seen chunks of ice in your water when it's especially cold outside.
If any of the above are familiar, then it's important to be proactive in the care of your home. Fortunately, knowing that your property is at an increased water damage risk of frozen and burst pipes puts you in a better position to avoid potential future damage. The key lies in knowing which preventative measures to take. Some solutions our company recommends can be found below.

Tips for Preventing Frozen Pipes

Keep Your Home Warm

Although many people turn down the thermostat at night, this can be detrimental to the pipes in an older home. Instead, it's recommended to keep your thermostat the same both day and night. This will help keep pipes warm, even when it's extremely cold outside.

Keep Cold Air Out

If you have a garage, then it's important to keep the door closed to prevent the cold outside air from coming in. If you must open it, make sure it's not left open for more than a few minutes before you close it again. Since this room is generally not insulated, keeping the cold air out can help keep pipes from freezing.

Let Your Faucet Drip

Turn on one of the faucets that's connected to an exposed outdoor pipe. Allowing it to drip even just a little bit will help minimize the risk of freezing when temperatures are low.

Open Your Cabinets

Open up the cabinets inside of your kitchen and bathrooms. This will give the pipes a better chance of staying warm so that they don't freeze.

Don't Turn off the Heat

If you plan on leaving for a vacation or the holidays, don't turn the heat off. Instead, leave your thermostat set at around 60 degrees. Although this may mean your energy bills won't be as low, it's worth it to avoid the potential expenses that are associated with water damage from burst pipes.

Seal Windows

Sealing your windows with plastic will help keep the outside air from coming in through any cracks or edges. Ultimately, this can help keep your home much warmer, which can lead to warmer pipes that don't freeze. If you don't want to seal your windows, then it's recommended to replace the weather stripping around them for added protection.

Add Insulation

If you're looking for a long-term way to minimize the risk of frozen and burst pipes, then insulate your pipes before it's cold out. This will be beneficial for the colder months but can also be useful throughout the rest of the year. That's because insulated pipes lose less heat, which means lower energy bills and better efficiency. To insulate your pipes, all you need to do is choose the type of foam insulation that works the best. You can install this yourself pretty easily, although many homeowners hire contractors so that they don't have to climb ladders or crawl into small spaces.

Seal Pipes Prone to Freezing

Find the pipes that are most prone to freezing around your home. Once you've identified these, wrap small sections of them with heating tape. This is easy to find at most home improvement stores and works like a charm for preventing pipes from freezing when temperatures are low. It's recommended to use automatic heating tape that will sense when it needs to be turned on. If you use manual heating tape, you will have to turn it on and off based on when you think the pipes might freeze.

Steps to Thaw Frozen Pipes

If you find that your water isn't freely coming out of the faucet or your toilets aren't refilling after flushing, this likely means that your pipes are frozen. When this happens, it's important to act fast to reduce the risk of those pipes bursting and causing thousands of dollars in water damage. You’ll want to follow the steps below as soon as possible.

Step 1. Turn Off Water

Find the main water line to your home and turn it off immediately. While this won't stop the pipes from bursting, it can help minimize water flow if they do break. This will also help prevent water from quickly rushing through pipes once the water does thaw and it's able to flow once again.

Step 2. Open the Pipe

To relieve any pressure that may have built up, turn both the hot and cold handles on your faucet so that they are open. Doing so will also ensure the water pressure isn't able to build up once the pipes have thawed out.

Step 3. Thaw Your Way

There are many different ways you can thaw out your frozen pipes. Choose which works best for you based on what you have available and are comfortable with using. Some of the best options for pipes that are exposed include:
  • Hot Towels: Wrap hot towels around pipes until they are thawed. This will require you to continuously rinse your towels with additional hot water, so it may be a slower option.
  • Electrical Heating Tape: This can prevent frozen pipes, but it can also help thaw pipes that have already frozen over. To use this, simply apply the tape onto the pipe and turn it on until it is thawed out. This is a great solution since you can leave it on to prevent freezing in the future.
  • Hairdryer: Grab your hairdryer and direct the hot air at the pipe, beginning with the area that's closest to the faucet. When using this solution, exercise caution to ensure the unit doesn't come into contact with water.
If you're dealing with a pipe that is inside of the wall, you're not out of luck. There are many solutions that can help speed up the thawing process. Some of the best options include:
  • Heat Lamp: Point a heating lamp at the wall where the blockage is located. Allow this to blow air until you see that the pipe has started to thaw. With this solution, use caution to keep the lamp moving and prevent it from coming in contact with water.
  • Increase the Heat: Turn your thermostat up to help make your home several degrees warmer. In many situations, this will thaw pipes without any extra work on your part.
  • Call a Plumber: If you need help with thawing enclosed pipes, contact a plumber for help. They will use their experience, training, and tools to help clear the blockage safely.

What if Your Pipe Bursts?

After turning off the main water line in your home, it's important to get the water out as soon as possible. From there, you'll want to dry the moisture and remove any materials that were damaged beyond repair. While this may be something you can do yourself, don't take on the project if it's too stressful. At Action 1 Restoration, we highly recommend calling a restoration technician if you need help. Professionals like ours can take care of the cleanup and make sure your home is restored the right way from start to finish.    

The blog post How to Thaw Frozen Pipes: Burst Pipe Prevention Steps See more on: http://www.action1restoration.net

]]>

If Your Pipes Are Frozen, Follow These Steps to Thaw Them Out

It's estimated that over 250,000 homes will experience water damage from frozen and burst pipes each year. These contribute to the nearly 2.5 billion dollars that the insurance industry pays out yearly on water damage and mold costs. With so much time and money spent surrounding this issue, many homeowners wonder what they can do to prevent this from happening in their own homes. Fortunately, there are many things you can do to care for and properly thaw your pipes in order to minimize the risk of them bursting. Even if you've gone through many winters without any issues with your pipes, this doesn't mean you'll be problem-free this year. You never know when a problem can occur, and for many homeowners, this means a surprise flood when they least expect it. At Action 1 Restoration, we want to help homeowners minimize their home's risk of flooding. We encourage you to read the information below to learn how to prevent burst pipes, thaw frozen pipes, and restore your home if water damage does occur.

Behind the Scenes: How Pipes Freeze and Burst

In most homes, water can run freely through pipes as long as the weather does not reach below 20 degrees. Unfortunately, in climates where the weather reaches below freezing, this can result in the water inside pipes freezing overnight when residents aren't using their plumbing. This is especially true for pipes that are located in areas of the home that are not heated or fully insulated, including the garage and unfinished basements. Once pipes are frozen, the water inside will naturally expand. Unfortunately, this often causes the pipes to burst, as they aren't able to handle the change in pressure. This can result in flooding, which will worsen as the pipes begin to warm up and thaw during the day. In situations where the pipes don't completely freeze, residents may find that their water is slow to move through the pipes. This is the result of ice pieces inside of the pipes that can be slow to melt.

Risk Factors for Frozen Pipes

It's important to recognize the signs of your home being at a greater risk of frozen pipes. By doing so, you may be able to prevent this from happening. Some red flags to look for in your home include:
  • You live in a very cold climate with temperatures that reach below freezing.
  • You live in an older home that doesn't have pipes that are well insulated.
  • You live in a cold area and several areas of your home are unheated.
  • You have outdoor pipes and live in an area that reaches freezing temperatures.
  • You have seen chunks of ice in your water when it's especially cold outside.
If any of the above are familiar, then it's important to be proactive in the care of your home. Fortunately, knowing that your property is at an increased water damage risk of frozen and burst pipes puts you in a better position to avoid potential future damage. The key lies in knowing which preventative measures to take. Some solutions our company recommends can be found below.

Tips for Preventing Frozen Pipes

Keep Your Home Warm

Although many people turn down the thermostat at night, this can be detrimental to the pipes in an older home. Instead, it's recommended to keep your thermostat the same both day and night. This will help keep pipes warm, even when it's extremely cold outside.

Keep Cold Air Out

If you have a garage, then it's important to keep the door closed to prevent the cold outside air from coming in. If you must open it, make sure it's not left open for more than a few minutes before you close it again. Since this room is generally not insulated, keeping the cold air out can help keep pipes from freezing.

Let Your Faucet Drip

Turn on one of the faucets that's connected to an exposed outdoor pipe. Allowing it to drip even just a little bit will help minimize the risk of freezing when temperatures are low.

Open Your Cabinets

Open up the cabinets inside of your kitchen and bathrooms. This will give the pipes a better chance of staying warm so that they don't freeze.

Don't Turn off the Heat

If you plan on leaving for a vacation or the holidays, don't turn the heat off. Instead, leave your thermostat set at around 60 degrees. Although this may mean your energy bills won't be as low, it's worth it to avoid the potential expenses that are associated with water damage from burst pipes.

Seal Windows

Sealing your windows with plastic will help keep the outside air from coming in through any cracks or edges. Ultimately, this can help keep your home much warmer, which can lead to warmer pipes that don't freeze. If you don't want to seal your windows, then it's recommended to replace the weather stripping around them for added protection.

Add Insulation

If you're looking for a long-term way to minimize the risk of frozen and burst pipes, then insulate your pipes before it's cold out. This will be beneficial for the colder months but can also be useful throughout the rest of the year. That's because insulated pipes lose less heat, which means lower energy bills and better efficiency. To insulate your pipes, all you need to do is choose the type of foam insulation that works the best. You can install this yourself pretty easily, although many homeowners hire contractors so that they don't have to climb ladders or crawl into small spaces.

Seal Pipes Prone to Freezing

Find the pipes that are most prone to freezing around your home. Once you've identified these, wrap small sections of them with heating tape. This is easy to find at most home improvement stores and works like a charm for preventing pipes from freezing when temperatures are low. It's recommended to use automatic heating tape that will sense when it needs to be turned on. If you use manual heating tape, you will have to turn it on and off based on when you think the pipes might freeze.

Steps to Thaw Frozen Pipes

If you find that your water isn't freely coming out of the faucet or your toilets aren't refilling after flushing, this likely means that your pipes are frozen. When this happens, it's important to act fast to reduce the risk of those pipes bursting and causing thousands of dollars in water damage. You’ll want to follow the steps below as soon as possible.

Step 1. Turn Off Water

Find the main water line to your home and turn it off immediately. While this won't stop the pipes from bursting, it can help minimize water flow if they do break. This will also help prevent water from quickly rushing through pipes once the water does thaw and it's able to flow once again.

Step 2. Open the Pipe

To relieve any pressure that may have built up, turn both the hot and cold handles on your faucet so that they are open. Doing so will also ensure the water pressure isn't able to build up once the pipes have thawed out.

Step 3. Thaw Your Way

There are many different ways you can thaw out your frozen pipes. Choose which works best for you based on what you have available and are comfortable with using. Some of the best options for pipes that are exposed include:
  • Hot Towels: Wrap hot towels around pipes until they are thawed. This will require you to continuously rinse your towels with additional hot water, so it may be a slower option.
  • Electrical Heating Tape: This can prevent frozen pipes, but it can also help thaw pipes that have already frozen over. To use this, simply apply the tape onto the pipe and turn it on until it is thawed out. This is a great solution since you can leave it on to prevent freezing in the future.
  • Hairdryer: Grab your hairdryer and direct the hot air at the pipe, beginning with the area that's closest to the faucet. When using this solution, exercise caution to ensure the unit doesn't come into contact with water.
If you're dealing with a pipe that is inside of the wall, you're not out of luck. There are many solutions that can help speed up the thawing process. Some of the best options include:
  • Heat Lamp: Point a heating lamp at the wall where the blockage is located. Allow this to blow air until you see that the pipe has started to thaw. With this solution, use caution to keep the lamp moving and prevent it from coming in contact with water.
  • Increase the Heat: Turn your thermostat up to help make your home several degrees warmer. In many situations, this will thaw pipes without any extra work on your part.
  • Call a Plumber: If you need help with thawing enclosed pipes, contact a plumber for help. They will use their experience, training, and tools to help clear the blockage safely.

What if Your Pipe Bursts?

After turning off the main water line in your home, it's important to get the water out as soon as possible. From there, you'll want to dry the moisture and remove any materials that were damaged beyond repair. While this may be something you can do yourself, don't take on the project if it's too stressful. At Action 1 Restoration, we highly recommend calling a restoration technician if you need help. Professionals like ours can take care of the cleanup and make sure your home is restored the right way from start to finish.    

The blog post How to Thaw Frozen Pipes: Burst Pipe Prevention Steps See more on: http://www.action1restoration.net

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Why Sewers Backup: Common Causes, Prevention and What to Do https://www.action1restoration.net/water/water-damage/common-causes-of-sewer-backups/ Mon, 17 Feb 2020 10:23:10 +0000 https://www.action1restoration.net/?p=1817

5 Most Common Causes of a Sewage Backup

Each year, thousands of homeowners find themselves dealing with water damage caused by a sewer backup when they least expect it. Unfortunately, because of the nature of the flooding, the cleanup for this can be particularly difficult. While it's certainly a situation that can be taken care of by trained professionals, it's still important for homeowners to prepare themselves for the unexpected. Below, Action 1 Restoration has shared some information that can help you understand more about dealing with and avoiding this type of disaster. When sewer backups happens, the wastewater that is used in your washing machine, toilet, showers, and sinks will push back into your home rather than going down the pipes as normal. Unfortunately, this means dangerous wastewater causing damage to your home when you least expect it. By understanding more about the causes of this type of disaster, you may be able to potentially prevent it from happening in your own home. This can pay off by making your home safer and teaching you tips for keeping your pipes healthy and running efficiently. sewer backup clog repair

1. Tree Roots Damage the Sewer Main Line

Although trees are beautiful and add privacy around the outside of your home, they can become dangerous when their roots grow into your sewer lines over time. This can cause a multitude of problems, including a sewer line backup right into your home. The only way to remedy this is by calling a professional to cut the roots away and then repair the sewer lines where they were damaged. If you have trees close to your home, have a plumber take a look at your sewer lines to see if they are in good shape. By being proactive, you may be able to catch a problem with tree roots before they begin causing real damage. Although this may mean taking trees out of your yard, it can be worth it for the safety of your pipes.

2. Sewer Line Clogs

clogged toilet sewage overflowIn most homes, clogged sewer lines are the main culprits behind sewer backups. Unfortunately, these can happen easily when residents’ flush things that cannot break down in pipes or put fats, oils, and food waste into the sink on a daily basis. When combined with hair and other debris that can naturally fall into the pipes, it's easy to see how a major clog can happen over time. The best way to prevent this is by being careful with what you put down your drains. This means never putting grease in the sink, disposing of coffee grounds in the garbage, keeping hair out of the bathtub drain, and not flushing things that won't break down in the sewer. At Action 1 Restoration, we recommend having a plumber clean out your pipes once per year to keep them running efficiently. As a bonus, this can also get rid of any clogs that might be present so they don't become bigger backups problems down the road.

3. Broken or Clogged Pipes

Even when pipes are made of durable materials, they can deteriorate over time. This is why older homes are at a higher risk of pipes breaking down and eventually collapsing. Even a small crack can cause problems and lead to a sewer backup. The only way to minimize backups risks is by having your pipes replaced if you live in an older home. While this can be a costly upgrade, it's worth it to avoid the potential damage sewer backups can cause.

4. City Main Issues

Your city's main sanitary line could have a blockage that slowly pushes sewage back into homes and businesses in the area. The only silver lining to this problem is that it won't happen quickly, which means you'll likely have time to report the problem before it gets worse.

5. Problematic Sewer Line Setup

Downspouts and gutters should not be connected to sanitary sewer lines, as this can push too much water into the pipes and lead to a backup when bad weather arises. If this is how your home is currently set up, it's recommended to speak with a professional about having outside water lines redirected away from your sewer line.
  • Dangers of Sewer Backup:
  • Water damage to your floors, walls, furniture, ceiling, and more
  • Exposure to dangerous bacteria, including Salmonella, Various Coli, and Helicobacter Pylori
  • Risk of electrical fire when water reaches outlets
  • Mold growth due to moisture in the structure

What to Do if a Backup Disaster Strikes

By being proactive with care for your home and its sewer lines, you may be able to prevent sewer backup from happening. However, it's important to note that this disaster can still happen even with regular care. If it does, it's important to act fast and have the damage cleaned up by an experienced restoration professional. While you may want to try to deal with this on your own, this can put you in danger of illness and leave your home in danger of increased damaged. At Action 1 Restoration, we understand that a backup is the last thing you want to deal with as a homeowner. However, it's crucial to act quickly as soon as you notice a problem. While a plumber may be able to help initially, any damage that occurs should be cleaned up by an experienced restoration technician. This will ensure your home is recovered and cleaned properly so it's safe to live in once the mess is cleaned up.    

The following post Why Sewers Backup: Common Causes, Prevention and What to Do is courtesy of Action 1 Restoration - Industry Leaders

]]>

5 Most Common Causes of a Sewage Backup

Each year, thousands of homeowners find themselves dealing with water damage caused by a sewer backup when they least expect it. Unfortunately, because of the nature of the flooding, the cleanup for this can be particularly difficult. While it's certainly a situation that can be taken care of by trained professionals, it's still important for homeowners to prepare themselves for the unexpected. Below, Action 1 Restoration has shared some information that can help you understand more about dealing with and avoiding this type of disaster. When sewer backups happens, the wastewater that is used in your washing machine, toilet, showers, and sinks will push back into your home rather than going down the pipes as normal. Unfortunately, this means dangerous wastewater causing damage to your home when you least expect it. By understanding more about the causes of this type of disaster, you may be able to potentially prevent it from happening in your own home. This can pay off by making your home safer and teaching you tips for keeping your pipes healthy and running efficiently. sewer backup clog repair

1. Tree Roots Damage the Sewer Main Line

Although trees are beautiful and add privacy around the outside of your home, they can become dangerous when their roots grow into your sewer lines over time. This can cause a multitude of problems, including a sewer line backup right into your home. The only way to remedy this is by calling a professional to cut the roots away and then repair the sewer lines where they were damaged. If you have trees close to your home, have a plumber take a look at your sewer lines to see if they are in good shape. By being proactive, you may be able to catch a problem with tree roots before they begin causing real damage. Although this may mean taking trees out of your yard, it can be worth it for the safety of your pipes.

2. Sewer Line Clogs

clogged toilet sewage overflowIn most homes, clogged sewer lines are the main culprits behind sewer backups. Unfortunately, these can happen easily when residents’ flush things that cannot break down in pipes or put fats, oils, and food waste into the sink on a daily basis. When combined with hair and other debris that can naturally fall into the pipes, it's easy to see how a major clog can happen over time. The best way to prevent this is by being careful with what you put down your drains. This means never putting grease in the sink, disposing of coffee grounds in the garbage, keeping hair out of the bathtub drain, and not flushing things that won't break down in the sewer. At Action 1 Restoration, we recommend having a plumber clean out your pipes once per year to keep them running efficiently. As a bonus, this can also get rid of any clogs that might be present so they don't become bigger backups problems down the road.

3. Broken or Clogged Pipes

Even when pipes are made of durable materials, they can deteriorate over time. This is why older homes are at a higher risk of pipes breaking down and eventually collapsing. Even a small crack can cause problems and lead to a sewer backup. The only way to minimize backups risks is by having your pipes replaced if you live in an older home. While this can be a costly upgrade, it's worth it to avoid the potential damage sewer backups can cause.

4. City Main Issues

Your city's main sanitary line could have a blockage that slowly pushes sewage back into homes and businesses in the area. The only silver lining to this problem is that it won't happen quickly, which means you'll likely have time to report the problem before it gets worse.

5. Problematic Sewer Line Setup

Downspouts and gutters should not be connected to sanitary sewer lines, as this can push too much water into the pipes and lead to a backup when bad weather arises. If this is how your home is currently set up, it's recommended to speak with a professional about having outside water lines redirected away from your sewer line.
  • Dangers of Sewer Backup:
  • Water damage to your floors, walls, furniture, ceiling, and more
  • Exposure to dangerous bacteria, including Salmonella, Various Coli, and Helicobacter Pylori
  • Risk of electrical fire when water reaches outlets
  • Mold growth due to moisture in the structure

What to Do if a Backup Disaster Strikes

By being proactive with care for your home and its sewer lines, you may be able to prevent sewer backup from happening. However, it's important to note that this disaster can still happen even with regular care. If it does, it's important to act fast and have the damage cleaned up by an experienced restoration professional. While you may want to try to deal with this on your own, this can put you in danger of illness and leave your home in danger of increased damaged. At Action 1 Restoration, we understand that a backup is the last thing you want to deal with as a homeowner. However, it's crucial to act quickly as soon as you notice a problem. While a plumber may be able to help initially, any damage that occurs should be cleaned up by an experienced restoration technician. This will ensure your home is recovered and cleaned properly so it's safe to live in once the mess is cleaned up.    

The following post Why Sewers Backup: Common Causes, Prevention and What to Do is courtesy of Action 1 Restoration - Industry Leaders

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